Here at DotScot we aim to reach as many Scots possible, including those across the globe. We have a team of dedicated Global Ambassadors to help spread the word and promote Scotland’s online identity.  Here we introduce Theresa Mackay, who’s recent work made headlines as she explored the historic influence of female Highland Inn Keepers in their local communities.

Growing up in a Scottish-Canadian household whose family came from Glenlivet meant that my Scottish heritage has always played a part of my life. This has had a major role in my work and the expression of my identity. As Assistant Professor in the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management at Royal Roads University in Victoria, British Columbia, my specialisation is cultural heritage with a particular emphasis on Scotland. This is a topic that has woven its way through both my Master of Letters (Distinction) from the University of the Highlands and Islands and my Ph.D from the University of Victoria (2024 expected).

The connection of my culture to my work and, consequently, my everyday life, is the way I live authentically.

“As a hyphenated Scot and one whose work is infused with Scotland, I believe that cultural sustainability is key to a healthy future.”

Authentic living by identifying with a culture and expressing it through cultural heritage (such as traditional song, story or dance) is one way we, as diaspora Scots, contribute from a worldwide perch to the sustainability of our culture. Another, more contemporary, way can be via our digital identity by choosing DotScot over the identity-less dot com. No matter your company, institution, or online musings, DotScot keeps your Scottish connection and culture at the forefront, reminding everyone of your link to Scotland.

Can authentic living be achieved by simply using DotScot? Likely not! However, expressing your identity with digital tools such as a .scot domain means you are publicly recognising your cultural connection to Scotland and contributing to your culture.

As a hyphenated Scot and one whose work is infused with Scotland, I believe that cultural sustainability is key to a healthy future.

Theresa can also be found on Twitter.